Library Curriculum

The library’s curriculum help graduates leave as competent, critical and ethical users and producers of information and ideas. They also seek diverse perspectives and use social tools responsibly and safely.  The four strands of literature appreciation, information literacy, digital citizenship and life-long learning spiral through out the grades while the inquiry process happens across content and disciplines. Students learn to be transliterate reading and communicating in digital, visual, textual and technological formats.

Lower school

In the literature appreciation strand, lower school students:

  • Recognize a variety of genres from different ethnic and cultural heritages.
  • Utilize windows and mirrors (compare and contrast) lens to build connections and empathy.
  • Participate in MCBA- Massachusetts Children’s Book Awards and study other award winners.
  • Choose reading materials in multiple formats for daily reading habit.

In the information fluency strand, lower school students:

  • Understand that the process of inquiry has discrete steps.
  • Access and use specific resources for beginning research as a class or individually.
  • Use simple steps of finding, organizing and presenting information.
  • Locate information in library using the dewy decimal call number.
  • Locate book to answer specific information question.
  • Locate information within a book using non-fiction text features.
  • Evaluate resource for its ability to answer specific information problem.
  • Determine if information found meets information need.

In the digital citizenship strand, lower school students:

  • Examine media messages.
  • Discuss cyber bullying.
  • Understand that using digital tools and social web 2.0 platforms require responsible behavior.
  • Use information ethically crediting with simple citations.
  • Understand copyright especially in terms of information and images found on the web.

In the life-long learning strand, lower school students answer:

  • How can libraries help us understand that knowledge and culture is transmitted in multiple formats including visually, digitally and textually?
  • How can libraries help us solve information problems?

Middle School

In the literature appreciation strand, middle school students:

  • Recognize a variety of genres from different ethnic and cultural heritages.
  • Choose reading materials in multiple formats for daily reading habit.
  • Broaden exposure to and enjoyment of a wide-range of reading including a variety of genres, perspectives, and formats both digitally and in print.

In the information fluency strand, which supports subject-specific instructional goals with co-planned critical thinking research projects, middle school students:

  • Locate, evaluate and take notes on a variety of sources of information.
  • Identify patterns and connect ideas across multiple resources.
  • Learn to use tools and strategies to organize and present research.
  • Formulate subsidiary research questions for a provided essential question.
  • Develop keywords to aid in search strategies.
  • Evaluate a variety of sources for readability, reliability, credibility.
  • Synthesize of information.
  • Utilize multiple sources of information including databases, print and internet searches.
  • Engages in self-reflection.

 In the digital citizenship strand, middle school students:

  • Participates responsibly in the networking and sharing of ideas.
  • Recognize the ways in which they create a digital footprint and start protecting their on-line presence and representing themselves honestly.
  • Use a variety of software, apps, and web 2.0 tools to meet their information need.
  • Continue to do honest academic work, by citing sources and abiding by fair use and copyright practices.
  • Abide by Sua Sponte ethics online both for personal and academic pursuits.

In the life-long learning strand, middle school students:

  • How can I use what I know to make a difference in the world?
  • How do multiple points of view help me form a global perspective?
  • How can I collaborate with others to use information to solve problems empathically?

Upper School

In the literature appreciation strand, upper school students:

  • Broaden exposure to and enjoyment of a wide-range of reading including a variety of genres, perspectives, and formats digitally and print.
  • Deeply understand themselves as readers in terms of habit, taste, and understanding of text.
  • Reads, views, and listens to stories for a variety of purposes.
  • Makes connections across works, genres, and authors.
  • Understands creator’s purpose, point of view, voice.
  • Uses a variety of tools to respond to and or evaluate literature.

In the information fluency strand, which supports subject specific instructional goals with co-planned critical thinking research projects, upper school students:

  • Contribute positively to a learning community by effectively working in groups to pursue and create information understanding the importance of information in a democratic society.
  • Draw conclusions to make informed decisions.
  • Uses divergent and convergent thinking to apply knowledge to new situations.
  • Connects learning to local and national community and global issues.
  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources (historical documents, databases, interviews, photographs, museums).
  • Extract relevant information by summaries, synthesis, analysis and note taking in organized manner using print or digital tools.
  • Formulate essential questions.
  • Demonstrate mastery of information gathering, synthesizing, evaluating and creating culminating in a public project.

In the digital citizenship strand, upper school students:

  • Participates responsibly in the networking and sharing of ideas.
  • Recognize ways in which they create a digital footprint and start protecting their on-line presence and representing themselves honestly.
  • Use a variety of apps, and web 2.0 tools to meet their information need.
  • Continue to do honest academic work, by citing sources and abiding by fair use and copyright practices.
  • Abide by sua sponte ethics online both for personal and academic pursuits.
  • Demonstrate leadership in social media etiquette and demonstrate upstander behavior.

In the life-long learning strand, upper school students:

  • Seek multiple points of view to grow a global perspective.
  • Participate ethically and productively as a member of our democratic society.
Library Hours

Monday/Wednesday:
7:30am-4:00pm

Tuesday:
7:30am-12:45pm

Thursday/Friday:
7:30am-4:00pm

Library Staff

Sam Kane
Library Director
B.A. Middlebury College
M.Ed. Saint Michael's College
M.Ed. Cambridge College

Liza Halley
Library Teacher
B.A. Brandeis Unversity
M.A. University of Vermont
M.S. Simmons College


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An Independent Day School
for Boys Grades 4-9

516 Monument Street, Concord, MA 01742

Tel: (978) 369-5800 Email:  info@fenn.org

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